▿ More Articles ▿ GURU SWIM BIKE RUN COACHING  
SWIM ▿
Swim Basics
Technique
Propulsion
Swim Sets & Pacing
Wetsuits
Open Water
Dryland Workouts
Race Day
More Speed
Pool Tools
BIKE ▿
Ride Safe
Form Counts
Perfect Position
Pedal in Circles
Cleat Position
Be Aero
Cornering & Climbing
Pacing
Bike Choices
Wheel Choices
Need for Speed
Forward or Back
Cadence
Tire Tech
Adversity
RUN ▿
Hit the Trail
Form Counts
Stretching
Economy
Pacing
Tempo
Distance
Speedwork
Fartlek/Hills
Brick Runs
Recovery
Form Drills
Alternative
Shoe Choices
Injury Prevention
Coach Steve being aero!

RIDE SAFE: Accidents happen. Among the athletes I coach there's typically one accident a month in-season; some are minor and some are not. Taking precautions will reduce the potential for accidents, and if you're aware of all the possibilities it's more likely that you'll be able to avoid potential accident scenarios.

On a bike you're subject to all the same rules as cars though many drivers think of you more as a nuisance than another vehicle sharing the road. Don't make the assumption that drivers see you unless you can make eye contact with them. Don't assume they realize how fast you're moving. Many drivers never rode a bike as an adult so they perceive you as a child on a bike, underestimating your speed and not fully accepting that you need to move with the traffic like any other vehicle. Also don't assume all drivers have the same skill level or reaction time you do. There are many drivers on the road that shouldn't be.

Obey the road signs as you would driving a car. You'll set a good example and maintain the respect of motorists. Wear a helmet.

Choose your training routes carefully. There are roads I would never ride; roads with a high speed limit and no shoulder come to mind.

Be aware of road hazards:

  • Potholes and rocks that can pinch a tire, or worse, break a wheel.
  • Sand and wet leaves.
  • Wet pavement (note that metal and painted lines are more slippery than pavement).
Traffic:
  • Vehicles not stopping at signs.
  • Vehicles turning as though you don't exist.
  • Vehicles pulling out of driveways, parking lots and parking spaces.
The same rules apply to race days. Never assume you're totally safe on the course. Roads are rarely if ever closed for race day, and course marshals are doing their best in dealing with delayed drivers. I recall a local race where the police officer stationed at the most dangerous intersection on the course never showed. The race organizer didn't know until after the event was done and one rider was injured at the crossing.
contact Coach Steve content ©opyright tri-Guru